Obsessive Compulsive Food Tracker

I thought I was crazy. I track food in my Weight Watchers app and my LoseIt app.  I have my reasons, like, the WW app doesn’t have a way to look at my nutrient breakdown to know if I am managing my carb, protein, fat and sugar levels. It also doesn’t provide feedback insights on my eating patterns to let me know what is working and what isn’t. But I like the WW app because snapping points with my scanner makes shopping really easy and keeps me connected to the program and the meeting discussions. Anyway, then I also have my Apple Watch that tracks my activity.

For an analyst, all this data is amazing!

Then I get to my WW meeting and find that tracking is just something people are doing to log their points. They might even do this at the end of the day rather than as they eat. Whether that works for them or not I’m not going to judge, to each their own. But, I realized that I must sound like an obsessive compulsive food tracker.

Then comes my analyst colleague, Brandon. I knew he was in our WW group but since we are both big travelers, this was the first time we were in a meeting together.  When asked how us newbies were doing with tracking, Brandon told his story about spending 3 hours in the grocery store scanning everything and realizing how eating what he thought was healthy was actually not as healthy as he thought. He is as obsessed about the tracking and data as I am!

Anyway, there is something about this tracker approach that does help a lot. If you are with others that are also tracking, each is learning something new about how to not only get the most out of the program but also learn how to reset your eating (and activity level for that matter). You can share favorite foods and let each other know how many points they are.  For example, I love nuts. Janice in my WW group mentioned that I could swap out my 4 point nut snack for a 2 point option of 20 pistachios.

So, if you are tracking and only doing it because its just something you were told to do, stop, think. It drives a level of accountability with yourself. It allows you to talk to people and get support in a way that general conversation doesn’t to learn new behaviors. And, most important, it will help you recognize where to make changes and how to keep those changes for life because you form new eating and activity habits.

Yes, at times double tracking, plus looking at my watch, plus blogging takes time. But, if I can fit this into an incredibly hectic life that most would not envy, you can do this too.

Chubby girl out – going for a walk with my dog to track some activity!